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Past Participle (Partizip II)

A past participle (Partizip II) is a verb form used to express actions that have already happened. It’s an essential component in forming the perfect tense, which indicates […]

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Perfect (Perfekt) tense

In German, the perfect (perfekt) tense is used to talk about actions that have been completed in the past. Unlike English, which often uses the simple past tense […]

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Separable verb (trennbares Verb)

Trennbare Verben are compound verbs in German that consist of a verb stem and a separable prefix. The unique feature of these verbs is that the prefix can […]

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Verb “Möchten”

The verb “möchten” in German means “to want” or “to desire,” and it can be used personally to express requests, suggestions, or interests. This verb also functions as […]

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Accusative case (Akkusativ)

In German, Akkusativ is one of the four grammatical cases, alongside Nominativ, Genitiv, and Dativ. It primarily indicates the direct object of a sentence, i.e., the thing or […]

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Nominative case (Nominativ)

Understanding Kasus in German In German, Kasus denotes the grammatical case of a noun, pronoun, or article, which translates to “case” in English. There are four main cases: […]

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Modal Verb “können”

“Können” translates to “can” in English, and it’s a modal verb used to indicate various shades of ability, permission, or possibility. It’s an essential component of German grammar, […]

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Negation “Kein”, “Keine”

“Kein” and “keine” are indefinite articles used to express negation in German. They correspond to the English words “no,” “not any,” or “none.” Their form changes depending on […]

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Indefinite Article

In German, the indefinite article (singular) is used as “ein.” This article is used to refer to an unspecified entity or object, and for a specific object, the […]